previous
Exhibition
The Paradox of Power
4 May - 27 May 2023

Exhibition Opening: Saturday 6 May, 2 – 4 pm.

To view and purchase artworks from this series
scroll to the end of this webpage or visit the gallery between 4 – 27 May 2023.

The Paradox of Power by Jason Wing presents a series of artworks that boldly critique contemporary Indigenous and Australian politics through the adoption of both current and historical political protest slogans.

Described by critics as “tough, necessarily blunt, yet often witty and lyrical, Jason Wing challenges dominant accounts of Australian history”. Wing is a Sydney based artist who strongly identifies with his Chinese and Aboriginal Biripi heritage. With works held in the collections of most of Australia’s major cultural institutions, his art protests the loss of the rich traditions and cultural identities of his layered dual heritage and challenges prevailing perspectives of Australian history and settlement.

Featured within this exhibition are a number of new shields which form part of an ongoing series of important works which so far spans 2017-2023. The first of which debuted when early works from the series were exhibited at the National Gallery of Australia as part of Defying Empire: 3rd National Indigenous Art Triennial at the National Gallery of Australia in 2017. Throughout this series, the works have continued to evolve, with the artist sometimes utilising LED lighting to highlight text and at other times etching imagery into rusted steel. Powerfully consistent throughout the series, we see the motif of the shield used as a call to arms, signalling both defence, attack and a memorial.

Cover photo. Installation view Artereal Gallery. Jessica Maurer Photography.

“My latest exhibition “The Paradox Of Power” asserts the fact that the harder the dominant powers control us – the harder we must fight back. This series is part of my ongoing fascination with shields as a way of memorializing, archiving, and actioning Indigenous protests. We have been protesting since 1770 and largely ignored as our cries for injustice and equality does not suit the colonial project agenda still. I memorialise the usually ephemeral placards as a comment that we are protesting the same issues since 1770 and we need to reuse the placard statements until the issues are eradicated and actioned rather than the symbolic rhetoric from people who benefit from colonial oppression of Aboriginal people still.”  – Jason Wing

Grounded in Australian history, these potent steel battle shields reference the Gwegal shield –  a priceless Indigenous historical artefact held in the British Museum. Some are adorned with political slogans created by the artist or taken from placards displayed during the Black Lives Matter protests. Others display historical Aboriginal figures, such as King Burraga – one of the most significant and timeless protest figures in the ongoing Indigenous rights campaign – who was ahead of his time in his use of broadcast media and his demands for an Aboriginal voice to parliament.

With their compelling messages of resistance and their references to historical injustice and systemic racism, Jason Wing’s shields act as a powerful call to arms.

“The common thread throughout my practice is the everyday battle which Aboriginal people fight living in this colonial institutional framework. We fight for re-writing Aboriginal history that has been erased, destroyed, hidden and lost. We fight for equal human rights. We fight for our culture to be respected, valued and celebrated in a genuine way. We fight for equal rights socially, culturally, politically and economically.” – Jason Wing

Identifying as both an artist and activist, Jason Wing has exhibited widely nationally and internationally. He has delivered a range of significant public art commissions and is represented in most major Australian collections including the National Gallery of Australia, the National Gallery of Victoria, the Art Gallery of New South Wales, as well as in prestigious Australian and International public, corporate and private collections.

– Rhianna Melhem, Curator

Artist Biography

Calling into question our understanding of history and of our current socio-political reality, Jason Wing repurposes everyday objects and imagery, creating works that are both visually confronting and deceptively simple.

Wing holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Sydney College of the Arts, University of Sydney and a Bachelor of Graphic Design, Sydney Graphics College. He has exhibited nationally and internationally. Significant solo exhibitions include: People of Substance, Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection, Virginia, USA, 2012; Hazelhurst Regional Gallery & Arts Centre, Gymea, 2011; Tree Change, Arc One Gallery, Melbourne, 2012; and The Other Other, Tandanya National Aboriginal Cultural Institute, Adelaide, 2011.

Wing’s iconic bronze sculpture Captain James Crook (which rethinks the narrative of Australian history) has also recently been acquired by the Art Gallery of New South Wales for their permanent collection.

Selected group exhibitions include: Defying Empire: 3rd National Indigenous Art Triennial, National Gallery of Australia, 2017; in)VISIBLE: the First Peoples and War, Lake Macquarie City Art Gallery, 2015; Wondermountain, Penrith Regional Gallery and the Lewers Bequest, Emu Plains, 2014; The Native Institute, Blacktown Arts Centre, Blacktown.

2013; Making Change, National Art Museum of China, Beijing, 2012; Cold Eels and Distant Thoughts, Monash University Museum of Art, Melbourne, 2012; Bungaree: The First Australian, Mosman Art Gallery, Mosman, 2012; Look Closely Now, Lake Macquarie City Art Gallery, NSW, 2012; and Made in China Australia, Salamanca Art Centre, Hobart, 2012.

In 2012 he won the Parliament of NSW Aboriginal Art Prize for his provocative work Australia was Stolen by Armed Robbery. Wing’s work is held in both private and public collections including the National Gallery of Victoria, the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra; the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney; the Australian National Maritime Museum, Sydney; Artbank, Sydney; Blacktown Council, Blacktown, NSW; and the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection, Virginia, USA.

Jason is also well known for numerous major public art commissions including his project In Between Two Worlds commissioned by the City of Sydney for Little Hay Street, Sydney; his large scale sculpture The Serpent located on the Bay Run in Drummoyne, and his most recent large scale work, Gadigal Mural for the Australian Design Centre in Darlinghurst, Sydney.

All prices are in Australian dollars and inclusive of GST.
Delivery costs not included – p
lease contact the gallery for assistance with delivery.

Prices are correct at the time of publication but may be subject to change without notice.
For sales enquiries email: info@artereal.com.au

Jason Wing

Untitled (King Burraga)

2023
Etched Corten steel and aluminium bracket
120 x 45.6 cm
unique
$12,500
Buy Now
Jason Wing

Untitled (Politricks)

2023
Etched Corten steel and aluminium bracket
120 x 45.6 cm
unique
$12,500
Buy Now
Jason Wing

Untitled (War Fair)

2023
Etched Corten steel and aluminium bracket
120 x 45.6 cm
unique
$12,500 (SOLD)
Jason Wing

Untitled (The Hardest Part Is Admitting That We Knew All Along)

2023
Etched Corten steel and aluminium bracket
120 x 45.6 cm
unique
$12,500
Jason Wing

Untitled (Day of Mourning Still)

2022
Etched Corten steel and aluminium bracket
120 x 45.6 cm
Edition 3 + 1 AP
$12,500
Buy Now
Jason Wing

Untitled (Black Lives Matter Still)

2022
Corten steel, powder-coated, matt varnish, LED lighting with power block and aluminium bracket
120 x 45.6cm
Edition 3 + 1 AP
$12,500
Buy Now
Jason Wing

Untitled (Sedition)

2022
Corten steel, powder-coated, matt varnish, LED lighting with power block and aluminium bracket
120 x 45.6cm
Edition 3 + 1 AP
$12,500
Buy Now

Additional Information

Upcoming Exhibition

main gallery
Owen Leong
5 April - 27 April 2024

Previous Exhibition

main gallery
Hyun-Hee Lee
2 February - 24 February 2024